You’re Going to Feel Woozy

The picture above is the way my foot has looked for the past several months. It’s obvious the left ankle is swollen due to an OCD lesion injury. (Osteochondral Defect)

The day of surgery arrived, May 8, 2019. I checked in at the surgical center by 10:30 am, having eaten nothing since midnight before. No water either.

After spelling and saying my name and birth date several times, I changed into a hospital gown and waited. I was given a sharpie pen and asked to write “yes” on the injured ankle and “no” on the healthy one. When Dr. Badger came in to see me before surgery, he actually signed his name on the injured leg.

I met the anesthesiologist to learn the drugs they would be using. Propofol, Fentanyl, and some gases. I wouldn’t be intubated completely, but would have a mask on my face the whole time.

When I was taken into surgery, I laid down on a hard table. Then, they put a warm blanket on me. Ahhhh…..That is the best part.

The mask smelled horrible, like a harsh chemical, and I felt slightly claustrophobic breathing into it.

“We’re administering the Propofol now. It may burn in your arm for a second…”

A few seconds later….

“Jackie, you’re all done. Can you wiggle your toes?”

Sipping some water, I noticed my throat was dry, and felt a little rough. I was so thirsty. No matter how much I drank, my mouth remained dry.

Dr. Badger came in to explain the lesion was much larger than expected, but that everything was fixed now and should heal nicely.

I don’t remember the IV coming out, but I was dressed and ready to leave the surgery center by 2:30. My foot was wrapped in a splint I would not be allowed to remove until my appointment the next day.

I wasn’t in any pain all day, and into the evening. I tried keeping my foot propped up and iced as much as possible.

I realized very quickly using the scooter and crutches I’d borrowed were going to be a real drag.

The Injured Can’t Be Choosy

In my previous post I told you about an ankle injury I sustained when saving a child from a burning building.

Okay….not. I did something slightly less heroic to cause my ankle injury – I stepped off my front porch and rolled my ankle.

It is true that for several months I waited for it to heal, and it never did.

I finally saw an orthopedic surgeon – a family friend – Dr. David Badger. He has done surgery on my husband and my son. When I saw him on April 9th, 2018 I fully expected he’d want an x-ray. I was right.

Dr. Badger noticed there was fluid around my ankle. The x-ray didn’t show a break, however Dr. Badger thought my pain could be caused by a small broken bone on the back of the ankle, which is not always visible in an x-ray. He was certain the ligaments were problematic.

Dr. Badger suggested the next step was an MRI to more clearly show the full injury.

A week later the MRI was completed and I heard the diagnosis.

“Your foot is bad, really bad. I’m actually surprised.”

I was diagnosed with an Osteochondral Defect (OCD), and torn ligaments. Dr. Badger explained that when I stepped off that porch and landed strangely on my left ankle, I broke both cartilage and bone in the joint where leg bone meets foot bone. (Tibia and Talus).

Sounds like a jazz duet doesn’t it? Tibia and Talus.

Secondly, the ligaments were torn and would not heal back without SURGERY. Yes, he said the word: SURGERY.

Oh, man. I didn’t want surgery. I hate drugs and the way I feel under their influence. I worried about the down time – which I can’t afford to take, not to mention the worry of being a klutzy person on crutches. Not a happy thought.

Nevertheless, I was scheduled for surgery on May 8th. I was told I’d be in a splint for three weeks and would NOT be allowed to put any weight on my ankle during that time. After three weeks with the splint, I might wear a boot for another three weeks.

Delightful!

The First Step is a Doozey

Sunday, December 23rd, 2018. The day it happened. My husband and I had been hosting “Christmas Camp” with our four grandchildren. This was the day we’d planned to take them to the snow in Easton. Our son lives there. He and his wife were looking forward to seeing their nieces and nephews.

As grandpa (Bub) kept the kids occupied with playing a game, I was doing what grandma’s do – packing up the car for the one hour trip. I had an arm load of coats, ski pants, blankets, etc. and headed out for the umpteenth time to the car in the driveway.

Without seeing the step, I must have miscalculated the distance, and with my left foot stepped onto what I thought was the first step. Only, it was the second step. My foot landed harder than I was ready for, and my ankle didn’t like it.

My foot rolled inward, and I stumbled down the driveway. Thank goodness the minivan was backed in, and not far away. If it had not been there to break my fall, I would have gone all the way down.

The pain was instant. I could barely breathe. I probably cursed out loud, although I can’t be sure if I only thought about doing so.

After taking a moment to catch my breath, I placed the coats (still in my arms) into the car. I limped painfully back into the house.

“I twisted my ankle” was the only description which came to mind.

I had to be strong for the grandchildren. I didn’t want to ruin the fun they were looking forward to.

“Of course we’re still going to the pass,” I replied in answer to my husband’s question.

The outside of my left ankle immediately began to swell. My husband (a former ski patroller) wrapped my ankle and provided ice. He then had to complete the loading of the car.

The car ride was miserable, but by the time we arrived, the ibuprofen had begun to take the edge off. I limped around in the snow that day and played with the grandchildren as best I could. My son and his wife handed out gifts for the children, and we had a fun day.

Within a few days, my entire left foot was swollen and bruised. I believed I had twisted my ankle and it would take time to heal. I limped around for about a week, but most people probably wouldn’t have noticed.

I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia more than 30 years ago, and therefore daily pain is my constant companion. My left ankle was still sore and swollen even weeks later when I started working out with a new trainer. I was practicing patience in healing. I was sure the Fibromyalgia would slow the process, but I expected it would happen.

By the first part of April, 2019 I made the decision to see a doctor about my ankle that wasn’t fully healing. It was still swollen, sore, and often caused pain. I was certain I’d hear:

“You’re getting older, and it takes our bodies longer to heal.”

Hitchhikers, Healing, and Hosts

A few years ago my dog was dying from cancer. A pet owner is, at some point, faced with the task of making a difficult decision for their beloved companion; and I was face to face with this decision a second time in a 6-month period.

I was struggling daily with the question, “Is she ready to go?”

Life Mastery Radio host, Todd Alan, knew my struggle and turned me on to a guest he’d had on his show – a Shamanic Healer. I was skeptical at first about whether talking with such a person could really help me and my dog, Bandi; but more than that, I was searching for an answer I wasn’t finding.

I talked with Rose De Dan, and it changed everything. Skepticism quickly turned spiritual as I witnessed Bandi physically helped out of pain while I was on the phone with Rose. I talked with Bandi – actually communicated with her through the Shaman; and Bandi’s last days with us were extraordinarily better than they would have been had I not known her desire to keep living.

The May 7th guest on Life Mastery Radio (which I now cohost) was Ellie Pechet M.Ed., a Metaphysician, Shaman, Medium and developer of the Pechet Healing Technique. I was delighted to learn the same help Bandi received from a Shaman was available to ME!

I read a great deal of Ms. Pechet’s book, Hitching a Ride: A Guide to Earthbound Spirits and How They Affect You before the show. I enjoyed the many intriguing and inspiring stories found therein.

Ellie described her gift(s) as a gradual unfolding over time at the right times. She was trained in counseling, then energy healing; and later discovered her gifts as a Medium and Shaman.

“My abilities started coming in as memories”

Ellie’s main branches of work include:

  1. Removing harmful energies in her clients
  2. Healing core issues in her clients

Just as a hitchhiker thumbs for a ride from a stranger on the side of the road; a hitchhiker in Ellie’s world is a spirit who’s gotten stuck after death, and has missed the opportunity to go toward the light where their soul will continue its progress.

“These hitchhikers no longer have a physical vessel, but they have the same personalities and preferences they did in life. They may want to hang out with someone who is like them, or who happens to be in the same place they are during their transition from life to death (such as a hospital), especially if their death was sudden or tragic.”

Most often, the person who’s picked up the hitchhiker doesn’t even know it. Yet, there can be physical, mental, and emotional changes in the host, which he or she can’t explain. They may notice a change in personality; they may pick up new habits; or desire something they didn’t like before.

If the hitchhiker decides they want to have experiences like they did when they had a physical body, they may possess the host and wreak physical damage, such as depression, chronic illnesses, or addictions.

Ellie Pechet’s role is to help the hitchhiker willingly leave the host, and travel toward the light. Then she helps the host to recover, heal, and empower their natural energies to prevent another hitchhiker.

“I am a divine escort to help the hitchhiker get unstuck. My work in that regard is short-term, then I work with the host on his/her energies, and heal core issues.”

Recently, Ellie has begun telepathically communicating with African Elephants to heal their PTSD from poacher attacks. Whales and Sea Turtles have told Ellie they are full of plastic. She wants to heal them, and is on a campaign to reduce plastics, clean the oceans, and make boaters more aware of their threat to animals in the sea.

Ellie wants to talk with you, too. She will provide real results to real issues. Call her at 508-237-4929 or make an appointment online at www.PhoenixRisingHealing.com