Category Archives: Lessons from my Youth

Lessons in Recovery

It’s been four weeks since surgery to repair my Osteo Chondral Defect – a broken left ankle and torn ligaments. Recovery hasn’t been easy, but it hasn’t been as difficult as it could have been. I’ve learned some lessons during the past month. All of them can be applied to principles of leadership.

  1. A systematic problem-solving approach is necessary
  2. You will encounter roadblocks when you least expect it
  3. Taking a break is as important as staying productive
  4. You can empower the outcome

A systematic problem-solving approach is necessary

A few days after surgery I was given the okay to shower. Wait…my shower is a bathtub. I’m not going to be able to step into the tub when I only have one working leg. Even if I could get in with one foot, I can’t stand on that one foot the entire shower without risking a fall.

After trying to shower by sitting on the side of the tub, I realized there had to be another option. Thankfully, my sweet husband brought home a shower chair he’d purchased. Now I could easily get in and out. He also put a stool in the tub that doubled as both a foot rest, and a place to put the shampoo, cleanser, and soap. The challenge of simply showering became far less troublesome.

My shower set-up

The second problem to become quickly apparent was leaving the house and getting into the car. Thankfully my right ankle allowed me to drive just fine, but getting to that point was a cardio workout.

I came up with a step-by step system which decreased much of the stress.

Step one was to get out the door with everything I needed.

My view from front door to my goal – the car. Those two steps are what I tripped on and caused the injury in the first place. Whenever I’d have to go somewhere, I’d have to take the scooter and crutches.

Step two was to get the scooter down the steps and waiting for me

Once the scooter was pushed down the stairs, it would run into the back of the car and stop

Step three was to heft the scooter into the back of my van while standing on one leg

I’d used the crutches to get down the stairs, then on one foot I’d heft the scooter into the back of the van. It fit quite nicely.

Step four is to get from the back of the car to the drivers seat on one leg

The side door of the van was opened, and the crutches were placed behind my seat. Then I could hop to the drivers seat.

All steps were reversed when I got to my destination or back home

You will encounter roadblocks when you least expect it.

Two days after surgery I got into the car (practicing the above process), and drove to Issaquah to teach a 4:20 class at an office park in the conference room on the building’s second floor. Upon arriving, I parked near the side door, which is where the handicapped parking is marked.

I quickly noticed a problem. There was a sign on that door which read: “Entrance closed, please use front door.”

Knowing there were steps up to the front door, I began to make my plan as I scootered around the corner. Yep. I was going to have to get myself and the scooter up 3 concrete steps in order to get into the building.

Seeing no one around, I had no choice but to do this alone. Thankfully there was at least a banister I could grasp with my right hand while carrying my teaching supplies. Doing so, I hopped one step at a time while I dragged the scooter behind me with my left hand. If I let go of the scooter, it would roll back down the steps, and I would truly be stranded. There are so many parts of this process which could have gone awry, but they didn’t. I made it to the top with scooter and supplies. I was exhausted, but empowered.

After the class was over, there were parents of my students available to help me down the stairs with scooter and supplies. I’m thankful for moms and dads!

Two weeks after this incident, I discovered the elevator in the same building out of order. I got into the building just fine, but now couldn’t get to the second floor to teach my class. By this point, I was wearing a boot and using a crutch to get around instead of the scooter.

A student found me stranded and carried my bag of supplies up the stairs for me. I took each step very slow with my boot and crutch. With labored breath and perspiration pouring down my face, I may have given the receptionist a piece of my frustrated mind. Her lack of empathy and responsibility made me even angrier. Customer service is dead.

I had to get myself down the stairs after the class in time to get to another class starting 20 minutes from then in a location 20 minutes away. Maybe I should have taken some time off, but hey I made it work.

Roadblocks, shmoadblocks…I knocked ‘em down instead of allowing them to knock me out.

Taking a break is as important as staying productive.

A week had passed since surgery, and I posted pictures of my foot on Facebook. Facebook physicians began to diagnose all sorts of horrible conditions: infection, cellulitis, gangrene, etc. I admit it wasn’t pretty. My foot was extremely red and swollen.

At the insistence of several “commenters” I emailed the surgeons office with pictures of my foot. Should I come in? Is my foot going to fall off? What if a blood clot kills me instantly?

“Are you resting?”

“No.”

“Are you icing your foot?”

“Yes, but only about once a day.”

“Are you elevating it?”

“Not really.”

The physician’s assistant chastised me kindly, and told me I needed to take care of my health. She was confident it wasn’t infected, but that the blood was pooling in my foot because I wasn’t elevating it, nor acting on the other instructions I’d been given.

Alright, alright. I took her instructions to heart and took the day “off”. I didn’t attend a meeting that evening and sent my regrets. My foot looked much better by the next morning. I realized I had been trying to maintain my regular schedule while my foot needed that expended energy elsewhere –  to heal.

Sometimes “pro”ductivity, may actually be “con”ductivity. I learned there is always a good, better, and best option to every choice. I was making a good choice to stay on top of work, but I was not making the best choice to take care of my health.

You can empower the outcome

Nine days after surgery
One day shy of two weeks post surgery I had the stitches removed
I was doing so well at 13 days post surgery, I was given the boot!

Preparation is key to making any outcome successful. Prior to the surgery I’d been working out, eating right, and generally taking care of my health. I believe those actions bolstered the healing process.

Oh, I’ve taken a few steps backward in my muscle building endeavors, but I hope my body’s cell memory will be recalled quickly, allowing me to strengthen my legs again with weights and cardio. My dogs have been sad but patient without their daily walk.

It will take time to get back to where I was, but at least I’m not starting at ground zero. Maybe ground six?

Four weeks after surgery
Four weeks after surgery. I was told I no longer needed the boot, and could walk without any assistance.

My injury was an Osteo Chondral Defect (OCD). OCD also means Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. I’m sure I obsessed about the tasks I wasn’t getting done; which drove me to compulsive actions to prevent disorder in my home and work life. Remember, I’m not a patient person. However, I’m grateful this chapter is coming to a close.

Patience is A Virtue (so they say)

I will admit before going much farther that I get frustrated easily. I try to be efficient with my time; and when out-of-my-control events happen, frustration is always brewing underneath my calm exterior. Having to recuperate from surgery is high on the list of brewing frustration.

Aaarrgghh!

I never thought much about having two legs. Now that I’m without one leg temporarily, I feel amiss at not recognizing the value of “standing on my own two feet.”

Anyone reading this who has been without a leg or limb a large part, or most of his/her life, I don’t mean to offend you in my recent epiphany, but to honor you for your patience in what is surely a frustrating situation.

Even before “the day after surgery” dawned, I had to travel to and from the bathroom two times in the darkness of night. I used my scooter, which squeaked and moaned, and had to be backed up, turned, and navigated in my groggy, half-awake state.

Seriously?

It was difficult to keep my leg propped up on a pillow all night, but I didn’t have pain, and that makes all the other frustrations acceptable.

I had an appointment with Dr. Badger’s physician’s assistant at 11:00 AM. I had to drive myself there. But even more difficult than that, was getting out of the house and into the car. That however, was still easier than getting out of the car and back into the house. There is definitely going to be a lot of right-leg hopping in my future.

Amanda, Dr. Badger’s PA removed the splint and revealed my frankenfoot underneath.

Yikes!

A removable splint was put on my foot, and I was told I could remove it for showering and/or applying ice. My ankle is pretty ugly, and was quickly covered up with surgical tape and a plastic cover which I am asked not to remove. I can shower, but not bathe. No soaking of the foot.

Later this same afternoon, I had to teach a class in Sammamish. It was hard enough to just get in and out of the house earlier in the day, but now I had to take teaching supplies with me. Whew, what a workout. I was seriously sweating when I finally, yet safely, made it into the car.

You’re Going to Feel Woozy

The picture above is the way my foot has looked for the past several months. It’s obvious the left ankle is swollen due to an OCD lesion injury. (Osteochondral Defect)

The day of surgery arrived, May 8, 2019. I checked in at the surgical center by 10:30 am, having eaten nothing since midnight before. No water either.

After spelling and saying my name and birth date several times, I changed into a hospital gown and waited. I was given a sharpie pen and asked to write “yes” on the injured ankle and “no” on the healthy one. When Dr. Badger came in to see me before surgery, he actually signed his name on the injured leg.

I met the anesthesiologist to learn the drugs they would be using. Propofol, Fentanyl, and some gases. I wouldn’t be intubated completely, but would have a mask on my face the whole time.

When I was taken into surgery, I laid down on a hard table. Then, they put a warm blanket on me. Ahhhh…..That is the best part.

The mask smelled horrible, like a harsh chemical, and I felt slightly claustrophobic breathing into it.

“We’re administering the Propofol now. It may burn in your arm for a second…”

A few seconds later….

“Jackie, you’re all done. Can you wiggle your toes?”

Sipping some water, I noticed my throat was dry, and felt a little rough. I was so thirsty. No matter how much I drank, my mouth remained dry.

Dr. Badger came in to explain the lesion was much larger than expected, but that everything was fixed now and should heal nicely.

I don’t remember the IV coming out, but I was dressed and ready to leave the surgery center by 2:30. My foot was wrapped in a splint I would not be allowed to remove until my appointment the next day.

I wasn’t in any pain all day, and into the evening. I tried keeping my foot propped up and iced as much as possible.

I realized very quickly using the scooter and crutches I’d borrowed were going to be a real drag.

The Injured Can’t Be Choosy

In my previous post I told you about an ankle injury I sustained when saving a child from a burning building.

Okay….not. I did something slightly less heroic to cause my ankle injury – I stepped off my front porch and rolled my ankle.

It is true that for several months I waited for it to heal, and it never did.

I finally saw an orthopedic surgeon – a family friend – Dr. David Badger. He has done surgery on my husband and my son. When I saw him on April 9th, 2018 I fully expected he’d want an x-ray. I was right.

Dr. Badger noticed there was fluid around my ankle. The x-ray didn’t show a break, however Dr. Badger thought my pain could be caused by a small broken bone on the back of the ankle, which is not always visible in an x-ray. He was certain the ligaments were problematic.

Dr. Badger suggested the next step was an MRI to more clearly show the full injury.

A week later the MRI was completed and I heard the diagnosis.

“Your foot is bad, really bad. I’m actually surprised.”

I was diagnosed with an Osteochondral Defect (OCD), and torn ligaments. Dr. Badger explained that when I stepped off that porch and landed strangely on my left ankle, I broke both cartilage and bone in the joint where leg bone meets foot bone. (Tibia and Talus).

Sounds like a jazz duet doesn’t it? Tibia and Talus.

Secondly, the ligaments were torn and would not heal back without SURGERY. Yes, he said the word: SURGERY.

Oh, man. I didn’t want surgery. I hate drugs and the way I feel under their influence. I worried about the down time – which I can’t afford to take, not to mention the worry of being a klutzy person on crutches. Not a happy thought.

Nevertheless, I was scheduled for surgery on May 8th. I was told I’d be in a splint for three weeks and would NOT be allowed to put any weight on my ankle during that time. After three weeks with the splint, I might wear a boot for another three weeks.

Delightful!

The First Step is a Doozey

Sunday, December 23rd, 2018. The day it happened. My husband and I had been hosting “Christmas Camp” with our four grandchildren. This was the day we’d planned to take them to the snow in Easton. Our son lives there. He and his wife were looking forward to seeing their nieces and nephews.

As grandpa (Bub) kept the kids occupied with playing a game, I was doing what grandma’s do – packing up the car for the one hour trip. I had an arm load of coats, ski pants, blankets, etc. and headed out for the umpteenth time to the car in the driveway.

Without seeing the step, I must have miscalculated the distance, and with my left foot stepped onto what I thought was the first step. Only, it was the second step. My foot landed harder than I was ready for, and my ankle didn’t like it.

My foot rolled inward, and I stumbled down the driveway. Thank goodness the minivan was backed in, and not far away. If it had not been there to break my fall, I would have gone all the way down.

The pain was instant. I could barely breathe. I probably cursed out loud, although I can’t be sure if I only thought about doing so.

After taking a moment to catch my breath, I placed the coats (still in my arms) into the car. I limped painfully back into the house.

“I twisted my ankle” was the only description which came to mind.

I had to be strong for the grandchildren. I didn’t want to ruin the fun they were looking forward to.

“Of course we’re still going to the pass,” I replied in answer to my husband’s question.

The outside of my left ankle immediately began to swell. My husband (a former ski patroller) wrapped my ankle and provided ice. He then had to complete the loading of the car.

The car ride was miserable, but by the time we arrived, the ibuprofen had begun to take the edge off. I limped around in the snow that day and played with the grandchildren as best I could. My son and his wife handed out gifts for the children, and we had a fun day.

Within a few days, my entire left foot was swollen and bruised. I believed I had twisted my ankle and it would take time to heal. I limped around for about a week, but most people probably wouldn’t have noticed.

I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia more than 30 years ago, and therefore daily pain is my constant companion. My left ankle was still sore and swollen even weeks later when I started working out with a new trainer. I was practicing patience in healing. I was sure the Fibromyalgia would slow the process, but I expected it would happen.

By the first part of April, 2019 I made the decision to see a doctor about my ankle that wasn’t fully healing. It was still swollen, sore, and often caused pain. I was certain I’d hear:

“You’re getting older, and it takes our bodies longer to heal.”

They are Always There

Linda Deir Book“They are always there.”

I am a co-host on Life Mastery Radio with Todd Alan. Our guest on April 30th was Linda Deir. She encouraged us to to begin journaling. Therefore this post will be in the form of a journal. Thanks for indulging me.

Sunday, April 28:

I began to read the book “Guided: Her Spirit Guide Angels Were Her Best Friends and Life Coaches” by Linda Deir, our guest on Life Mastery Radio this week.

From the introduction I was hooked. The author and I have so much in common related to our childhood experiences, I found it difficult to put the book down. Her memories reach as far back as 20 months old, when she began to know her Spirit Guides.

Her Guides told her, “For you, life will get better as you get older if you make it through childhood.”

Life was rough for Linda Deir at the time because she was being abused by her mother, and knew her mother didn’t love her. Linda’s Angel Guides’ advice was similar to what I’d always told myself during my abusive childhood: “If I make it out of this alive, I will be stronger than I can ever imagine.”

Reading the rest of her story is something I look forward to.

Monday, April 29:

I continued to read Linda Deir’s book as often as I could catch a few minutes. I even read it while my students took a quiz in class today, and each time I stopped at a red light while driving. Her story, and her ability to overcome such a harsh home life is familiar to me. Her Guides were so obviously there for her. Was I missing something?

I often feel as though my struggles are constant, and the guidance I seek is without reach. Why can’t I seem to get clear answers? Why do I often seem to be gliding along, trying this and trying that, but not really seeing a reason for it?

I would have read all night to finish Linda Deir’s book, but I can’t seem to stay awake.

Tuesday, April 30:

I read more of Linda Dier’s book at breakfast, and even while exercising. I tuned in to the show excited to talk with her in person. I was taken aback by the connection we made through similar life experiences, and by her advice and guidance.

Linda generalized her life as “Childhood Bootcamp” – merely a training to get her in shape for the rest of her life; and learning the skills she’d need to be a survivor. She talked about her Guides using the following descriptive phrases:

  • “They are always there.”
  • “They don’t dwell on the past.”
  • “They guide you through the present.”
  • “They are always with you.”
  • “If a connection is broken with your Guides, it’s because we have broken the connection.”
  • “Guidance is an intelligence.”
  • “People who have good memories have a connection to their Guides.”
  • “Journaling helps you begin to see how your Guides infiltrate your writing.”

Because journaling has become a strong tool for Linda Deir to keep in constant connection with her Guides, she has published a journal companion to her book as a system of regaining connection with our own Guides.

15 minutes

Linda’s Guides told her:

“Journal 15 minutes a day without distractions for one month. Write down what’s going on in your life; make note of your dreams; what people said to you that day; thoughts you had in the shower and/or while driving.”

The promise from Linda’s Guides:

“If you journal for one month chronologically, you’ll know what Linda knows, and you’ll be able to SEE IT – the guidance. When you tie your words together, you’ll see the richness of what your Guides are telling you.”

  • Write it down
  • Note how it felt
  • State what you learned
  • Commit to taking action

“All intuition has a shelf life. The action may be something you can only imagine taking. Unless you write it down, you won’t capture it.”

Linda Deir was raised by Spirit Guides. She was living a covert childhood. She let family believe they were raising her, but it was her Guides who were helping her to learn. Angels were taking care of her.

“We are assigned amnesia when we get here. We unlearn what we knew only to have to learn it again. We have to labor, rediscover, and learn. We all signed up for this. Guides will help you see that life makes sense. They will influence you.”

I’m going to www.lindadeir.com and purchase her companion journals!

A Cure for Emotional Malignancy

Watch the video above before reading further….


“The mind does not act only through conscious choices…many of its effects are achieved directly on the body’s tissues, without any awareness on our part.”

This is a quote from Dr. Bernie Siegel’s book Love, Medicine & Miracles. In reading his book a second time (I first read it while going through therapy for childhood sexual abuse), I find his suggestions, ideas and research have a lot of merit. I believe my own mother developed Alzheimer’s in the same way that his book suggests many people develop cancer.

“One of the most widely accepted explanations of cancer theory states that cancer cells are developing in our bodies all the time but are normally destroyed by white blood cells before they develop into dangerous tumors. Cancer appears when the immune system becomes suppressed and can no longer deal with the routine threat. It follows that whatever upsets the brain’s control of the immune system will foster malignancy.” ~ Bernie Siegel, MD Love, Medicine & Miracles

It is my belief that malignancy does not have to be cancerous. We cause malignancy of mind and wellness when we refuse to forgive and harbor anger or hatred. When we see ourselves as victims of circumstance rather than searching for ways to be victorious over our circumstances, we develop malignancies of character. We don’t empower ourselves, but actually undermine our God-given power.

“The body responds to the mind’s messages…these may be either ‘live’ or ‘die’ messages.” Besides the fight-or flight response, we also have a “die” mechanism that brings us closer to death when we feel our life is not worth living. ~ Bernie Siegel, MD Love, Medicine & Miracles

My mother is 87 years old. She has lived a life of sadness, fear, and heartbreak. That alone does not cause malignancy. It is holding onto the sadness, fear and heartbreak that cause, first our mind to be depressed, then our physical body to take hold of a “die” mentality. I’ve seen it! I’ve lived with my mother, and I witnessed rare times when she escaped her challenges and focused instead on helping someone else with their challenges.

Perhaps the only way my mother had to escape the regrets in her life was to forget. Why wouldn’t anyone with the same experiences want to forget? There have certainly been times in my life when I wished for emotional Alzheimer’s. How wonderful it would have been to forget all the hurt and pain.

I realize all of us live through tough times, but the difference between my mother and me is that I have learned to forgive and let go of the sadness, fear and heartbreak. I don’t want to forget it, because every experience has shaped my character, and I am confident that my influence has been of worth to others.

Not everyone who suffers a tragic loss, stressful change in lifestyle, is abused as a child, or experiences sadness, fear and heartbreak will develop an illness. The deciding factor seems to be how one copes with the problems they are seemingly powerless to escape from.

“Depression is a partial surrender to death, and it seems that cancer is despair experienced at the cellular level.” – Arnold Hutschnecker The Will to Live

I worked for years to overcome the hatred I felt for my abusers; the hatred I had for myself; and the desire to die so I didn’t have to deal with it. It hasn’t been easy, but as I included supportive people in my healing, it allowed me to let go of it and face it, all at the same time. My mother was never able to do that, and therefore her mind did it for her. If you watched the video associated with this post, you know that she no longer remembers me, nor most of her family. It’s sad, very sad. The saddest part of all is that I truly believe she could have prevented it. In other words, our state of mind has an immediate and direct effect on our state of body. If we ignore our despair, the body receives a “die” message. If we deal with our pain and seek help, then the message is “living is difficult but desirable” and the immune system works to keep us alive.

Self-healing comes from the ability to love self. It comes through SELF centered-ness, SELF-ishness, and SELF reliance. SELF is the acronym I use in my book for the characteristics of exceptional leadership.

  • SACRIFICE
  • EMPOWERMENT
  • LOVE
  • FRIENDSHIP

When these traits are mastered, we have healed our minds, our hearts, and our bodies. We don’t have to worry about emotional malignancies, and we can lead others for good through our influence and intentions.

2016-10-13-seeing-mother

I’m so grateful I saw my mother when I did. Even though she did not know me (but for a moment) I’m not sad for her. I’m not sad for me. She is happy. My mother is the happiest I have ever seen her. Her memories, experiences, and personality traits may be gone. Yet, so are her regrets, pain, and fear. She needed Alzheimer’s disease.

Have you learned to forgive and let go of the sadness, fear and heartbreak? Instead of trying to forget, just forgive. Every experience you’ve had will shape your character, and your influence for good will be of worth to others.

Interested in reading my book? It’s on AMAZON. When you purchase through this link, part of the proceeds will go to ORAL CANCER CAUSE to fight malignant cancers of the mouth and throat.

SELF Centered Leadership: Becoming Influential, Intentional and Exceptional

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Your Odyssey Has Begun – Whose Eyes Will You Look Into?

Advice.  We’re surrounded by it.  With the advent of the internet there are friends, followers, gurus and goofballs who will tell you they have the solution to your every problem.

Perhaps you consider me a friend.  You may follow this blog, and I may follow yours.  There are some who call me a guru, and more who know me as a goofball.

I don’t have a solution to your every problem, but I have gained wisdom through experience that I’m happy to share.  In fact, many years ago I was asked by a counselor,

“Jackie, if you could speak to Heavenly Father right now, what would you ask him?”

My response then is the same response I’d have today:

“What do you want me to do now?”

The first time I was asked this question was at the finish line of emotional hell overcoming childhood abuse.  With a more complete perspective, I could see how my circumstances, experiences, and challenges of the past had shaped me into the person I was then.  I had always known that if I made it through that healing process I would have more strength than I could have ever imagined.

I was strong.  I had survived.  I was glad I had chosen to keep moving forward.  That odyssey was complete.

I was at the beginning of another Odyssey.  Where would I go, and what would I do?  How can I influence the lives of others?  These were the questions I would ask God, “What do you want me to do now?”

That wasn’t the last time I began an odyssey in life.  It wasn’t the last time when I’ve been able to look back and gain perspective.

There was the time when I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia 30 years ago.  That was the start of an odyssey.

There was the time I decided to start my business, Emerald City Consulting.  That was an odyssey.

There was the time I said yes to District 2 leadership in Toastmasters International.  That was an odyssey.

There was the time I wrote my book, SELF Centered Leadership.  That is the beginning of your odyssey.

Each time I’ve disembarked from one odyssey, I’ve embarked on another.  That’s the way life should be!

Please take a moment to watch this video featuring a song from John Denver titled “Come and Let Me Look In Your Eyes”

I invite you to embark on an odyssey to exceptional leadership by looking through my eyes.  I identify four traits that have helped me gain perspective from my challenges and experiences in my book, SELF Centered Leadership.  I invite you to read it.

It will help you answer the question,

“What do you want me to do now?”

 

Knock, Knock. You Gonna Get That? Reason #3

We’ve all heard it.  That knock on the door.   Our first thought is, “Who could that be?”

Opportunity Knock | Power of Yes

Do you ignore the knock?  Pretend you’re not home?

Or, do you open the door?  Is it a little crack to first determine if it’s safe to open further?  Or do you open to the visitor with wild abandon?

Opportunity knocks.  You may shrink at the unknown and stay secure in your current state, or you can empower your future by saying yes to new experiences.

Through personal stories shared in my book, SELF Centered Leadership, you’ll  see that my character was shaped by saying yes and answering the door.  You can grow by simply engaging in opportunity.

This is reason #3 in my 30 Reason to Read countdown.  It’s almost done!  Have you read my book yet?

#30 – You’ll learn to prepare for and survive an ODYSSEY!

#29 – You’ll learn how to spot IMITATIONS everywhere!

#28 – I’ll show you an APP to help you make tough decisions

#27 – I’ll introduce the Three P’s of Empowerment and how to apply them in your life

#26 – Wanna overcome regret?  I show you how!

#25 – I will illustrate how YOU can be heroic in your leadership!

#24 – You’ll learn my one-word definition for leadership

#23 – Friendship can sting.  I’ll tell you what I mean when I introduce you to Lexi and Debbie.

#22 – You’ll learn how to be EXCEPTIONAL!

#21 – You will know how to rise to the top of your fishbowl.

#20 – You will learn how to EMPOWER your life, your love, and your actions!

#19 – Love can be hazardous.  I teach you how to LOVE in a SAFE way.

#18 – My book makes a great stocking stuffer for anyone 12 and up!

#17 – You’ll be surprised to learn the 10 ways you influence others constantly!

#16 – You’ll learn to have charitable, brotherly love year round

#15 – You’ll learn the fishy art of caring for goldfish, and how to navigate your own fishbowl.

#14 – Learn to prepare for winter conditions

#13 – Learn how to communicate with credibility

#12Learn to lead with Intention

#11Learn ways to stop asking, and start helping

#10 – Help someone with oral cancer smile again by purchasing my book on www.smile.amazon.com choose Oral Cancer Cause

#9 – Stop eating Styrofoam!

#8 – You’ll have access to the SACRIFICE or VICE chart for decision making

#7 – Pain, Pain, Go Away!

#6 – Service is the best medicine.

#5 – Learn the Five Imitators of Happiness

#4 – Know the SECRET to get out of bed on those tough day.

The Secret to Getting Out of Bed – Reason #4

There have been times in my life when getting out of bed meant facing another day of worry, sadness, loneliness, pain, confusion and/or despair.  It was almost impossible to find a reason to get up.

Get out of bed | Hard days

If you’ve ever felt this way, or if you know someone who struggles with these self-defeating emotions, I know the secret!  I really do!

I share the secret to getting out of bed, even on the hardest days of your life, in my new book SELF Centered Leadership: Becoming Influential, Intentional and Exceptional.

The reviews from readers of my book are making their way onto Amazon, and it is wonderful to know that my message is changing lives.

One reader said…

“I enjoyed the book. It is a quick read, but one that I will go back to again, especially some parts that were especially meaningful to me. Like Ms Bailey says leadership begins on the inside. If you are a leader, want to be one, are being thrust into being one, start at the right place – with yourself. This book will give you a great start.”

Another reviewer wrote…

“Spot on! This book provides an easy, logical and true path to being a leader and guiding others along their way. It takes courage to provide personal examples and shows the authenticity of the writer.”

I hope you’ll find value in my message.  If you can’t quite get out of bed just yet, then read the book IN BED.  Once you know the secret, you’ll be able to get out of bed again and again, even in the midst of your biggest challenges!  That’s reason FOUR in my 30 Reasons To Read Countdown…..

#30 – You’ll learn to prepare for and survive an ODYSSEY!

#29 – You’ll learn how to spot IMITATIONS everywhere!

#28 – I’ll show you an APP to help you make tough decisions

#27 – I’ll introduce the Three P’s of Empowerment and how to apply them in your life

#26 – Wanna overcome regret?  I show you how!

#25 – I will illustrate how YOU can be heroic in your leadership!

#24 – You’ll learn my one-word definition for leadership

#23 – Friendship can sting.  I’ll tell you what I mean when I introduce you to Lexi and Debbie.

#22 – You’ll learn how to be EXCEPTIONAL!

#21 – You will know how to rise to the top of your fishbowl.

#20 – You will learn how to EMPOWER your life, your love, and your actions!

#19 – Love can be hazardous.  I teach you how to LOVE in a SAFE way.

#18 – My book makes a great stocking stuffer for anyone 12 and up!

#17 – You’ll be surprised to learn the 10 ways you influence others constantly!

#16 – You’ll learn to have charitable, brotherly love year round

#15 – You’ll learn the fishy art of caring for goldfish, and how to navigate your own fishbowl.

#14 – Learn to prepare for winter conditions

#13 – Learn how to communicate with credibility

#12Learn to lead with Intention

#11Learn ways to stop asking, and start helping

#10 – Help someone with oral cancer smile again by purchasing my book on www.smile.amazon.com  choose Oral Cancer Cause

#9 – Stop eating Styrofoam!

#8 – You’ll have access to the SACRIFICE or VICE chart for decision making

#7 – Pain, Pain, Go Away!

#6 – Service is the best medicine.

#5 – Learn the Five Imitators of Happiness